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Archive for the ‘team offense’ Category

Sins of the Recreational Basketball Player (2nd in a series)

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on May 7, 2012

Sins, of course, carry different weight, come in many shades, stain the basketball soul, sometimes more, sometimes less, permanently. The first sin we identified was Not Running the Floor; the gravity of that sin cannot be overstated. You might as well excuse yourself for a bathroom break, secretly locate and turn on the sprinkler system and send everyone home. Who are you kidding: you don’t want to be there and are just spoiling the game for everyone anyway.

Our second sin, Not Getting the Ball Inbounds Quickly When the Other Team Scores, is related. It has to do with running; it has to with effort; it has to do with the sublime consciousness of outthinking and outdoing and surprising the opposition. (The opposition is, of course, both the other team and the sedentary you.)

Here’s what happens in recreational basketball games: one team scores and the team that was scored upon walks the ball out of bounds and slowly, mutely, listlessly, defeatedly, looks for someone to throw the ball to. But this dullness turns out to be problematic in itself because the scored upon team, your team, is walking up-court, collective heads down, watching the other team celebrate. This is a sin. This is an affront to the collective basketball soul. This is what is wrong with humanity. Somehow basketball became football in the sense that after a score, it seems to be a virtual time-out. I mean, let’s sub and line the ball up and kickoff and then, but only then, try to bring the ball up-court and score. (I like football but get it off my basketball court!)

Like I said in the first post, I’ve played a lot of pick-up basketball and it has always been for me that when the other team scores, I am in a rage. Enraged. And I cannot wait to avenge what just happened. What to do? Take it out and get it in and up-court as fast as possible, preferably, hopefully, while the other team is still gloating, feeling unjustifiably good about themselves. When the ball drops through the net, it’s like the starter’s gun has gone off and you are up and out of the blocks. Their guard is down, is it not? Wipe that smile off their faces. Is there not great satisfaction in that? What happens when you run the ball out and scream for someone to throw it into and sprint up court is your teammates see what is happening and they join the race that you have begun. They run with you. They sense the passion, the possibility, the transcendent nature of basketball as a fast-paced, non-stop game. They scored on you; okay, that’s not a sin. But not trying to answer right away, that sits heavy on the soul.

Posted in beautiful basketball, fast break, general improvement, team offense | Tagged: | 3 Comments »

Michigan State’s Pressure Release Play

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on March 18, 2007

Michigan State Pressure Release PlayIn a recent NTL Boston Advanced Clinic, we set-up a high 1-4 offense to introduce players to the “UCLA cut”. The point guard passes the ball to the wing and then cuts off a high post screen to the block. That cut is the UCLA cut. We talked about the issue of getting the ball to the wing if the defender was overplaying there. What to do? What to do? Here’s what we said:

“Bounce pass it to the high post and on the catch, the wing goes backdoor to get a bounce pass for the score. This ‘pressure release’ play is a play that has been around a long time and it’s one that teams like to use coming out of a time-out, if the other team has been overplaying or are all jacked up, for some reason. You make them pay for taking away your pass to the wing.”

So, there I was last night, watching the Michigan State/Carolina game in the 2nd round of The Tournament. Carolina, of course, is pressuring Drew Neitzel and all the other Spartans everywhere and, then, time-out with about 2:30 left in the first half. Feeling somewhat drugged from the previous six hours of watching hoops, I open one eye to see MSU go 1-4, bounce pass to the high post, bounce pass to the cutting wing backdoor for the score. I wanted to email and phone everyone in the clinic and say, “did you see that? Did you see that? That’s how it works!” Instead, I high-fived my wife, low-pawed the dog, got back into the game. State ran the same play at least three more times, all with varying degrees of success (and with an eventual new wrinkle or two). That play brought to mind the Michigan State/Princeton match-up in the first round of the NCAA’s in 1998 when Michigan State turned the table on The Tigers, and in the process totally demoralized them, beat them at their own game, by scoring off that same high post pressure release play backdoor for the last play of the half.

Posted in beautiful basketball, passing, team offense | 4 Comments »

“Up Screen (Back Screen)”

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on February 4, 2007

nat-setting-screen.jpg
NTL Photo Library

If you come down court and you settle into the post and one of your teammates fills the wing area and you notice the wing’s defender really extending out, effectively in a “denial” position, it is a good idea to come out and back screen that defender. What the defender takes away on the outside, he/she gives up on the inside. It’s consistent with the principle of “reading the defense”: in taking away one thing, they give up something else. It is up to you, oh astute basketball player, to read it (see it and understand it) and take advantage of it. Don’t worry, after awhile it comes naturally. You’re doing lots of good things out there naturally already that fall under that principle, and you don’t even know it. It’s, like, in your soul, your basketball soul. (Okay, you’re right, you caught us. The photo was staged.)

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“Make the Extra Pass”

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on November 13, 2006

Passing is more important than shooting. An oversimplification? Yes. But a good group of passers who aren’t great shooters will still fare well because with good passing, they would eventually find a good shot, or a shot that even a not-so-good shooter would make. On the other hand, a good group of shooters who are not good passers won’t get good shots. Eventually that team will break down, alienate one another to the point that the game will degenerate into one big argument amongst team members and eventually someone, probably the guy who brought the ball, will say, “I’m goin’ home”. Basketball is movement, player movement and ball movement. The idea is to move and in moving, manipulate and tire the defense. When readying yourself to shoot – and even before – you should have in your mind and in your eye: is there someone somewhere on my team, who is more open the I am? “Nice pass” (along with “good hustle” and “good d”) are the sweetest words one can hear on the basketball court.

Posted in passing, team offense | 2 Comments »

“Weak-Side Screen”

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on August 31, 2006

After you pass the ball, dare you “go away”, away from the ball? Fear you’ll never get it back? Ever? Go ahead and screen away and shape up! Screen away to give the ball-side spacing for the post up, for the two player game, the drive middle, and to free up the cutter off your screen. Then “shape up” – not in a Dr. Laura-kind-of-way, but a Dr. Naismith kind-of-way – back to the ball. If the person you passed the ball to is aware, he will not only look for the cutter, but look for you stepping back to the ball, as well.

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“The Two Player Game”

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on August 24, 2006

In the last “Tip”, the idea of “relocating” after feeding the post was discussed. It’s automatic: you have to move after you dump the ball in. This creates the “Two Player Game”. Like the “pick-and-roll” or “give-and-go”, it’s standard and simple: just two players involved. In fact, much of offensive basketball synthesizes to that: a separating out of players to lend simplicity and manageability to what is going on out there. Who, unless you are Gary Kasparov, can keep track of the movements of more than two or three things at once? Isolate the post feeder and post player and feed and relocate and get the ball back from the post and pass it in again if you have to. Make a five-on-five into a two-on-two. It’s effective and a lot of fun (especially if you’re one of the two).

Posted in passing, team offense | Leave a Comment »

 
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