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Posts Tagged ‘ballhandling’

NTL Two Minute Warmup Ballhandling Drill (video)

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on April 24, 2015

The warmup drill we did at our recent NTL Weekend Camp in Lakeside, MI. Greg Tonagel, former star at Valparaiso University and NAIA Coach of the Year at Indiana Wesleyan University, takes you through the drill.

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Has the Basketball World Changed?

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on October 14, 2014

Years ago when I played lots of pick-up ball, it was, as often as not, a disaster. Constant arguing about calls; guys who did nothing but chuck the ball up; nobody playing defense; an empty soulless attitude and game. Of course, you learned where to go to find the better games, the games where real basketball was played. (Pemberton Street in North Cambridge was usually pretty good; Conway Park on Somerville Ave with the square metal backboards with the holes in them was a good spot, too, almost any day and any time.) Still, even those places could slide into scenes like the weigh-ins the day before a championship fight. I pretty much gave up on it all.

A couple of weekends ago we were in NYC for the Climate Change March and afterward, we were going to meet some friends and their kids at a playground; maybe 43rd St between 8th and 9th Avenues. There was a small fenced in basketball court (typical NYC cage court) and there was a game going on: 4 on 4. Couple Asian kids; a couple black guys; couple others of this and that thrown in. I stood back and watched a bit, just wondering what the game would be like. And there it was: ball moving, players finding one another under the basket, even a backdoor cut and layup. Next thing I knew, I had my fingers laced through the chain link fence, up close to get a better look and feel.

How did this come to be and is it the norm? And if it is the new norm, where did this come from? Was it the NTL Weekly Practice Programs and Weekend Camps?

Or maybe it was the move-the-ball and ye will find the open player on the way to the NBA Championship, San Antonio Spurs basketball?

Whatever it is, I’ll happily be looking for more of it. This can only mean good things for basketball and the world!

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“Alternating Hands Dribble in the Open Court”

Posted by Steve Bzomowski on January 14, 2009

When I was a kid going to camps and practices, coaches used to have us do the “speed dribble”. Basically going – supposedly – fast as you could using the same hand to dribble all the way up court. It’s what you were taught and directed to use during the hopelessly boring and inefficient use of time “relay races”. I’m pretty sure coaches at camps are still teaching the speed dribble. Last I looked, they were. Problem is, if what one wants to do in teaching hoops is to show players what the pros (and college players) do and help developing players master those skills, i.e., “do as the pros do”, none of the pros ever speed dribbles. Never! Watch! Instead, the technique they employ is the “alternating hands in the open court dribble”.

What is it? Well, what it is not is crossing over. Crossing over when running hard is too constricting, too tight to the body. That, in fact, is the problem with the speed dribble, as well; it doesn’t flow. Instead, imagine doing the Australian Crawl (swim stroke) while standing up and running with a basketball. That’s the “alternating hands in the open court dribble”. Push the ball out, almost as if you are telescoping your arm; out it goes then down goes the ball. Right arm out and slightly diagonally left, then left arm out and slightly diagonally right. Out and then down. Doing it that way never impedes your running progress and allows you to run quick-as-you-can with the ball, much speedier than the old, tired, seen-its-better-days speed dribble. (Video Coming Soon!)

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